Was there some “secret social sauce” in the way we learned in my grad class?

secret sauce

As I mentioned previously, I’ve been taking a graduate class at Northwestern that is essentially about using enterprise social networks to accomplish knowledge management. We’ve learned the theories behind both what knowledge and knowledge management are, the pros and cons for businesses and individuals, some of the psychology behind why people do or don’t readily participate, etc. Some of the readings were very dense and scholarly, and others were more lively and engaging. All in all, it has been a great experience.

Because I’m a practicing community manager, I have found that I can’t stop myself doing a lot of stepping back to assess what’s going on from that lens. In other words, I’ve been both a participant in and observer of the course. There’s been so much to reflect on behaviorally, even in myself.

Our last class meeting was this week, and one of the questions the instructor asked was how our attitudes had changed over the time period of the course. The vast majority of the students said that they were now much more likely to participate and even lead the way (model behaviors) in their company ESNs. Many of them described that before the class, they had been hesitant to participate for a variety of reasons, but had decided to step in now.

I have a few theories why that happened, but I don’t want to put them forth just yet. I’m hoping that by writing this post and pointing people to it, I’ll get some feedback. I sense there is at least a little bit of secret sauce in here – a way to better lead people to their own personal “Aha!” moment with enterprise social. It feels almost like it is on the tip of my tongue. But then I talk myself out of it because trying to talk to people at work about knowledge management seems like such an unlikely way to win.

Anyone game to help fill in some blanks here? I won’t name names, but I’m hoping a few of my classmates will help me think about this one out loud.

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